Saturday, November 25, 2006

Losing the creatives

Ho hum.

The NY Times reports, again, how Atlanta, Austin, Portland etc. attract young people, and after the age of 35, they stay put. Richard Florida is quoted again in this semi-annual article, and cities continue to lose population.

Hey, at least Saint Louis didn't make the bottom of the list. Maybe that is due to the lack of a bottom list mention.

We have been doing better, there is no denying that, but that doesn't mean we get an A. We still fall back into old habits and forget that this is a larger city than we think. There are a lot of people in this town. A few hot streets and budding districts. A housing boom and now a bit of a stall, but things are still way up from where they had been. A number of restaurants and other business opening, some halfway decent economic gains.

We are not gaining enough and we are still giving out government handouts to those who might not be in quite as much need, while others struggle to just operate in compliance with the law and even others are not even afforded the opportunity to operate legally.

Saint Louis needs to take a particular lesson from Atlanta. We very much have the ability to become the next Atlanta if we want to be. There is so much opportunity around us, if we allow it to happen.

7 Comments:

Anonymous SS said...

Yes, sir. I agree. That's why I'm staying put, dammit.

5:04 PM  
Blogger tokyocrunch said...

St. Louis should be confident in the possibility of a better tomorrow, shonuff. But "there is so much opportunity around us, if we allow it to happen"? That advice seems a remarkably passive approach to progress.

Now, obviously you're a guy who's plenty proactive -- so, judging from your previous posts, perhaps more appropriate is "There is so much opportunity around us, if only the grotesquely beaurocratic city government and provincial neighborhood despots allowed it to happen." Or am I misinterpreting the real hinderance to STL's magnetic possibilities?

11:20 PM  
Blogger Steven Fitzpatrick Smith said...

I am playing nice. It is better for long term progress to play nice. The message is the same. We as a city, regardless of however faulty it is, need to allow progress to happen. Progress is not a bad thing. Some might say it is a good thing.

12:11 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Steve said "playing nice".

He likes to use words like "scene" and "roll", but when he uses a word like "playing nice" to describe growth and development, and social interactions in the STL, I can see that he is becoming hip to the language and ways of the elite power structure in St. Louis.

Many politicians in the City of St. Louis, particularly the white, southside, status quo types, have built their careers based on "playing nice" and offending no one.

9:23 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Well, maybe he's just getting back to his roots. He also says "little boys' room."

10:32 AM  
Blogger Steven Fitzpatrick Smith said...

I expect to be around a long time. People don't want to hear a barking dog all the time. So when I so bark I mean it. And I have done it before many a time. And in the written work, barking is even less effective for the context can be lost, so I tend to save my barking for more personal conversation. I have been barking a lot more actually.

The funny thing to this analogy is that I always like walking through the alleys for all the dogs go crazy and bark and bark, and they set off each other from down the block. I actually enjoy barking. It is natural and free spirited. I like it when the barking gets set off. It freaks out the people who I might be walking with, but these dogs are all behind fences. The dogs get to jump and get their exercise on the simple fact that I am walking down the alley. Sometimes I will stop and get closer to the fence of a vicious sounding dog, big or small, and crouch down just inches away from them as they woof and snap away and tell them in a soothing voice, just how adorable they are. And they are!

10:37 AM  
Blogger Steven Fitzpatrick Smith said...

Yeah, I picked up my vernacular from my father. He is hardcore.

I also say potty. But that doesn't change the message, it just couches it for the faint of heart who can't handle the word "piss".

12:04 PM  

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